GreenJolly – Orange Revolution 2004 Mastermind

Eurovision Song Contest 2005 participant
 


EUROVISION SONG CONTEST


Eurovision News Review:

* Eurovision: Estonia’s ticket to ride
* Music fans braced for Eurovision
* No song for Ireland at Eurovision
* EUROVISION SONG CONTEST
* Tribute to presenter Price
* La Commission EuropeĆ©nne – nul points
* BBC Skillswise – In the News – Entertainment
* Boycott Israeli Science – Yes or No
* Full Transcript

Eurovision: Estonia’s ticket to rideCNN International
In that case, the tiny Baltic nation with fewer than 1. 4 million inhabitants is well on its way to Club Europe. The 47th annual Eurovision contest — ridiculed across much of Western Europe but watched by about 300 million people — is being hosted in the Estonian capital Tallinn on Saturday, thanks to Tanel Padar and Dave Benton’s victory in Denmark last year. Estonia first took part in Eurovision in 1994, three years after regaining its independence from the Soviet Union. Now it is firmly in the spotlight, and Estonians hope the rest of Europe is taking note. On Saturday, each of the 24 song entries will be introduced by a one-minute video postcard highlighting an aspect of Estonian life… 4 million inhabitants is well on its way to Club Europe. The 47th annual Eurovision contest — ridiculed across much of Western Europe but watched by about 300 million people — is being hosted in the Estonian capital Tallinn on Saturday, thanks to Tanel Padar and Dave Benton’s victory in Denmark last year. Estonia first took part in Eurovision in 1994, three years after regaining its independence from the Soviet Union. Now it is firmly in the spotlight, and Estonians hope the rest of Europe is taking note. On Saturday, each of the 24 song entries will be introduced by a one-minute video postcard highlighting an aspect of Estonian life.

Music fans braced for EurovisionCNN
The hosts of this year’s show, Estonia, are seen as coming in fourth, followed by France, Spain, Malta, Belgium, Denmark and Latvia. Estonia won the contest last year by a sizeable margin with the song Everybody, performed by Tanel Padar and Daven Benton. Eurovision organisers said in a statement: “Romania is the most unlikely to win this year’s Eurovision song contest. Each of the 24 song entries will be introduced by a one-minute video postcard highlighting an aspect of Estonian life. Estonia is “standing at Europe’s border and wishing hard to be part of it,” according to material produced by Estonian Television. Many Estonians are excited to have a chance to show off their country. Leane Morits, an office worker from Tartu, the country’s second city, said: “For Estonia, and especially for Tallinn, it is definitely great public relations.

No song for Ireland at EurovisionBBC News
But this story has nothing to do with Roy Keane’s early exit from the World Cup. It is worse than that – a Eurovision Song Contest with no Irish entry. A meagre six points was all Ireland could pick up in last year’s contest in Denmark. New European Broadcasting Union rules determined the record seven-times winning country would have to sit out the 2002 contest in Estonia… New European Broadcasting Union rules determined the record seven-times winning country would have to sit out the 2002 contest in Estonia. But with no Irish entry to cheer on, it just won’t be the same. So what has gone wrong?

Boy band guru Louis Walsh has criticised Ireland’s approach to the competition in recent years

Following last year’s result, he blamed national broadcaster RTE for not appearing to “have any interest in it any more”. “They allow people to enter who have had no previous television exposure. ”

Chart-toppers

Some people within the business feel Mr Walsh has a point.

EUROVISION SONG CONTESTDispatch Online
It’s the Eurovision Song Contest 2002, which this year was held in Estonia. The contest, which discovered the likes of Abba and Roxette, is now in its 46th year and was started when Europe was still recovering from World War 2 and television services were starting up all over Europe. The song contest was set up as means to unify countries. Ireland has won the Eurovision most — seven times in all — followed by the UK, France and Luxemborg, which have had five wins each. Finland has finished last on most occasions… The contest, which discovered the likes of Abba and Roxette, is now in its 46th year and was started when Europe was still recovering from World War 2 and television services were starting up all over Europe. The song contest was set up as means to unify countries. Ireland has won the Eurovision most — seven times in all — followed by the UK, France and Luxemborg, which have had five wins each. Finland has finished last on most occasions. Terry Wogan will present the transmission which takes place on BBC Prime at 21h00 tonight. CHEER FOR CHARLIE

CHARLIE Dimmock is known to many as the wild-haired, freckled garden transformer whose ability to install water features is legendary, although apparently in England the press makes more of the fact that she goes braless than of her talents as a gardener. Anyway, in Cheer for Charlie (Sunday, BBC Prime, 18h05) she ditches the garden in favour of the trapeze and after a three-month intensive training programme — in which she had to be hypnotised to conquer her fear of heights — she takes to the circus tent and joins the Flying Ciobanu in a sell-out performance.

Tribute to presenter PriceBBC News
The event was held specifically on the day of the Eurovision Song Contest as it was a lifelong ambition of the 34-year-old to front the contest. Before he was found dead at his London home last month, he had been lined up to host the digital channel’s coverage of the annual event. Former Eurovision contestant Nikki French, actor Adam Rickitt and singer Patti Boulaye were among those performing or reading at the event at Mezzo restaurant in Soho, central London. Liberty X, who had been championed by Price before his death, performed part of their debut single Thinking It Over. The group reached number one for the first time last Sunday with the song Just A Little… The event was held specifically on the day of the Eurovision Song Contest as it was a lifelong ambition of the 34-year-old to front the contest. Before he was found dead at his London home last month, he had been lined up to host the digital channel’s coverage of the annual event. Former Eurovision contestant Nikki French, actor Adam Rickitt and singer Patti Boulaye were among those performing or reading at the event at Mezzo restaurant in Soho, central London. Liberty X, who had been championed by Price before his death, performed part of their debut single Thinking It Over. The group reached number one for the first time last Sunday with the song Just A Little.

La Commission EuropeĆ©nne – nul pointsTelegraph.co.uk
I admit, like many people over 30, to fond childhood memories of sitting in my pyjamas cheering on Brotherhood of Man and Bucks Fizz. Older and wiser, I now see this strange spectacle for what it is – a tawdry, out-of-date institution with a voting system everyone thinks is rigged. The contest is to Europe’s cultural life what the Stability and Growth Pact is to the economic policy of the eurozone. That may strike you as an odd comparison – especially if, like many Britons, you’ve never even heard of the SGP… 8 per cent deficit. In a voting stitch-up reminiscent of the Eurovision scoreboard, Germany garnered support from fellow fiscal sinners to block the reprimand. The next day Die Welt pictured a full-page tombstone marking the death of the pact. Suitably encouraged, Italy has now joined in. Two weeks ago, prime minister Silvio Berlusconi scrapped the emergency budget measures needed to meet the SGP – again, breaking his Barcelona pledge. This sparked demonstrations in Portugal, where the new centre-right government has been stupid enough to actually take the SGP seriously, imposing tax rises and austerity measures in a bid to meet the legal obligations of eurozone membership.

BBC Skillswise – In the News – EntertainmentBBC News
“It’s a nice enough song – it’s completely different, it’s the first time we’ve had a. ” “It could go really well or it could go the other way – but we’ve tried other approaches recently and we know what happened to them,” he said. The UK came 15th in the 2001 contest ? after finishing 16th in 2000.

Boycott Israeli Science – Yes or Noabc.net.au
Transcript:
Robyn Williams: Steven Rose, Professor of Biology at the Open University in Britain is certainly deeply concerned [about the situation in the Middle East], so he began a protest that has now been taken up around the world. Steven Rose, what do you hope to achieve?Steven Rose: Well, we were desperate about the situation in the Middle East, the seemingly absolutely intractable position the Israelis were taking and particularly of course, then the invasions of the Palestinian West Bank territories over the course of the last couple of months. And we were very conscious of the analogy with apartheid South Africa, now whereas the South Africans, I guess like the Australians, are passionate about sport the Israelis are passionate about science culture and things of this sort, much less so about sport, though there is a Eurovision song contest as well. And we felt, well what could we do as citizens, as part of civil society, as academics. So we decided to draft a letter to the newspaper suggesting that there was a moratorium on institutional funding of collaboration with Israel until they went back to accepting the United Nations Peace Plan and started negotiations with the Palestinians on a serious basis. And we thought we?d just do it originally Hilary Rose, my partner and myself, and then we thought we?d collect a few signatures to go with it, and suddenly the thing mushroomed because huge numbers of European academics from across the whole of the European Union wanted to sign up, and so eventually we ended up with a web site set up by the French and many, many hundreds of signatures and appeals with similar letters in many countries across Europe. Robyn Williams: But how likely is such a moratorium to happen?Steven Rose: Well, I think what?s happening is that there are individual actions by individual colleagues who are, for example, not wanting to boycott or cut themselves off from their own Israeli friends and scientists are saying we will not review Israeli papers, or we will not actually act as referees for promotions in Israel.

Full Transcriptabc.net.au
Gould was a Jewish scientist and I don’t know how he felt about the Middle East, but his friend Steven Rose in Britain is certainly deeply concerned, and so this Professor of Biology at the Open University began a protest that has now been taken up around the world. Steven Rose, what do you hope to achieve?Steven Rose: Well, we were desperate about the situation in the Middle East, the seemingly absolutely intractable position the Israelis were taking and particularly of course, then the invasions of the Palestinian West Bank territories over the course of the last couple of months. And we were very conscious of the analogy with apartheid South Africa, now whereas the South Africans, I guess like the Australians, are passionate about sport the Israelis are passionate about science culture and things of this sort, much less so about sport, though there is a Eurovision song contest as well. And we felt, well what could we do as citizens, as part of civil society, as academics. So we decided to draft a letter to the newspaper suggesting that there was a moratorium on institutional funding of collaboration with Israel until they went back to accepting the United Nations Peace Plan and started negotiations with the Palestinians on a serious basis. And we thought we’d just do it originally Hilary Rose, my partner and myself, and then we thought we’d collect a few signatures to go with it, and suddenly the thing mushroomed because huge numbers of European academics from across the whole of the European Union wanted to sign up, and so eventually we ended up with a web site set up by the French and many, many hundreds of signatures and appeals with similar letters in many countries across Europe. Robyn Williams: But how likely is such a moratorium to happen?Steven Rose: Well, I think what’s happening is that there are individual actions by individual colleagues who are, for example, not wanting to boycott or cut themselves off from their own Israeli friends and scientists are saying we will not review Israeli papers, or we will not actually act as referees for promotions in Israel.

Leave a Reply