GreenJolly – Orange Revolution 2004 Mastermind

Eurovision Song Contest 2005 participant
 


UK news in brief | The Guardian | Guardian Unlimited


Eurovision News Review:

* Vote switch ‘stole Tatu’s Eurovision win’
* Eurotrash and treasure
* The view from…Istanbul
* UK news in brief | The Guardian | Guardian Unlimited
* Eurovision Song Contest 2006 at esctoday.com | your daily Eurovision…
* Losing Harte for Eurovision
* Kelly, Timberlake Rule UK Charts Again
* DK-Audio help Gigasat achieve full marks at Eurovision
* How to avoid going bananas in your Oxbridge interview
* You decided on Big Brother in Your Charts
* If Terry came home we could crown him king of chit-chat
* Results of Slovene televoting
* Participants in Norwegian Junior ESC final known
* Bump and grind of a new Europe
* The other players in the double-collection category : Gender-bending…
* Come on, Tony, let us have our say
* Pint to pint: Crown Posada

Vote switch ‘stole Tatu’s Eurovision win’Guardian Unlimited
Channel One TV released an indignant statement, which said it “officially declares that it discredits the voting results of the Eurovision song contest 2003”. Its complaint centres on Ireland’s voting practices. “At the last moment, tele-voting [by the Irish public] was exchanged for a vote by national judges”, the statement said, “because of a disagreement between the phone vote service provider and the [Irish] broadcast channel RTE. ” The statement claimed that the change, which occurred because the Irish phone vote results came in too late, meant that Tatu received fewer points from Ireland than the phone vote would have awarded them. The statement concluded: “Taking into account the insignificant difference in the marks (three points) between the first and third places, there are grounds to believe the contest results could be much different for Russia.

Eurotrash and treasureThe Age
They even bring a touch of Tolstoy to proceedings: the teenage girls and their entourage came to the Latvian capital via a 16-hour train journey from Moscow. The local press isn’t sure how to take this. Is it merely a novel way of making an entrance, or a more subtle and sinister slap from the Russians to an ex-Soviet state? (Maybe airports have simply become passe for eastern European pop stars; Ukraine’s entry, Olexandr, rolls in from Kiev in a Cadillac. ) But at least the last guests have arrived and the show can now begin… Is it merely a novel way of making an entrance, or a more subtle and sinister slap from the Russians to an ex-Soviet state? (Maybe airports have simply become passe for eastern European pop stars; Ukraine’s entry, Olexandr, rolls in from Kiev in a Cadillac. ) But at least the last guests have arrived and the show can now begin. Eurovision is 48 this year, a marker of middle age for most and a reminder, perhaps, of the roads not taken. This song contest is not immune. After almost half-a-century of pitting Balkan folk singers against British warblers, German crooners and Scandinavian trios, it has lately been doing its own mid-life soul searching. Its response has been to try to freshen its image, to show people it’s about much more than silly costumes and even sillier songs in the name of pan-European friendship. The orchestra has been ditched, most national juries have been abolished in favour of public tele-voting, and no one has to sing in their native language any more.

The view from…IstanbulGuardian Unlimited
Many papers carried large photos of the fire blackened site, highlighting charred bodies and the personal effects that lay alongside them. In among the gloom and doom there has, however, been a chance for the papers to do what they do very well – hail Turkey’s achievements in an international competition and indulge in some conspiracy theorising at the same time. On Sunday Turkey celebrated victory for Sertab Erenler in the Eurovision song contest. “Thank you Sertab,” trumpeted Hurriyet in English – a sign that the singer had been forgiven for performing in English, something that had aroused much critical comment before the competition but which was swiftly forgotten in the outpouring of emotion that followed her victory. Still, there’s no such thing as a simple victory; Sabah knew why Sertab had won – it was a belated reward for the much agonised-over vote, months ago, that denied US troops permission to operate from Turkey. The country lost the goodwill of the world’s only superpower and about $20bn dollars in cheap loans because of that decision. But the Eurovision crown is, at last, in Turkish hands… Still, there’s no such thing as a simple victory; Sabah knew why Sertab had won – it was a belated reward for the much agonised-over vote, months ago, that denied US troops permission to operate from Turkey. The country lost the goodwill of the world’s only superpower and about $20bn dollars in cheap loans because of that decision. But the Eurovision crown is, at last, in Turkish hands. Isn’t democracy wonderful? Special report.

UK news in brief | The Guardian | Guardian UnlimitedGuardian Unlimited
getElementById( ‘frameId978780’ ). ‘Summer of hell’ holiday warning Holiday firms have been warned to expect a big rise in customer complaints this summer inspired by “reality TV” shows such as Holidays from Hell and Cruise Ship. The customer service adviser Beyond Philosophy has reported 28% more inquiries from tour operators about coping with irate holidaymakers. BA cancels France flights British Airways last night cancelled 90 of its scheduled 120 flights to and from France tomorrow because of a planned strike by French air traffic controllers. The airline apologised to passengers, but said it was forced to act.

Eurovision Song Contest 2006 at esctoday.com | your daily Eurovision…esctoday.com
According to Greek website eurovision-greece. com, quoting Swedish newspaper Aftonbladet, Jostein Pedersen, the Norwegian commentator, described fame as ?less charismatic than an IKEA bookcase. Dagbladet reckoned that Petersen should be prevented from acting as a commentator in the next Eurovision Song Contest. The Nordic representative for EBU, Kjell Ekholm, is now said to be investigating the matter. “In Norway we call this humour.

Losing Harte for EurovisionIrish Independent
The quality of the song doesn’t appear to matter anymore, with countries voting for their neighbours regardless of how strong the song may have been. The system is clearly flawed, and the future of the contest looks to be in serious trouble. Even if Ireland were represented by U2 there’s a fair chance we wouldn’t win under this system. I don’t want to make a song and dance about this, but Eurovision should revert to the old system where a panel of judges in each country got together and accumulated the votes… The system is clearly flawed, and the future of the contest looks to be in serious trouble. Even if Ireland were represented by U2 there’s a fair chance we wouldn’t win under this system. I don’t want to make a song and dance about this, but Eurovision should revert to the old system where a panel of judges in each country got together and accumulated the votes. Under the current rules, fans of this competition will certainly lose Harte. Sean Keegan, Ferbane, Offaly. Speak up, Dick Sir – Minister Dick Roche, at a meeting of the Irish Centre for European Law in Trinity College, accused the larger EU member states of making an “unprincipled grab” for power in the final stages of drafting the new EU Constitutional Treaty. Imagine, representatives of the member states defending the interests of their citizens! How unprincipled.

Kelly, Timberlake Rule UK Charts AgainBillboard
Eurovision entry, “Cry Baby” by Jemini (Integral), which won zero points at the contest in Latvia on May 23, managed a No. CM8ShowAd(“Middle”); Below Timberlake on the album chart, girl group Girls Aloud opened at No. 2 with its debut set “Sound of the Underground” (Polydor), while Led Zeppelin’s three-CD live extravaganza “How the West Was Won” (Atlantic) arrived at No.

DK-Audio help Gigasat achieve full marks at Eurovision4RFV
This particular vehicle had to be equipped and wired within a week to ensure that it was ready for its first commission ? Latvian Television?s coverage of the Eurovision Song Contest. Although the UK achieved ?nil point? in the actual contest, the truck performed flawlessly and was given top marks by everyone involved in the broadcast. Waveform monitors are an important part of an OB?s technical infrastructure and as we have had such a good experience with this particular model I am confident that we will be using DK-Audio and PTV products again. ?Alongside OBs, Gigasat provides satellite mobile uplinks (flyaway and vehicles) and earth stations to a range of broadcast clients.

How to avoid going bananas in your Oxbridge interviewTelegraph.co.uk
You have a fistful of Grade As at A-level and are invited for interview by tutors at Oxford and Cambridge, only to be thrown by the obscure request: “Tell me about a banana. “A survey of 1,000 Oxbridge applicants has revealed some of the more bizarre questions posed by the two universities last year. One teenager, wanting to study history and politics at Oxford, was asked: “Is the Eurovision Song Contest an example of living nationalism?”advertisement. It offers interview training, refunded if an applicant fails to win a place. Its “premier service”, including mentoring programmes, private tuition and help with application forms, costs up to £3,500. James Uffindell, the firm’s founder, said: “Applying to Oxbridge is still seen as a mysterious process.

You decided on Big Brother in Your ChartsBBC News
Better luck next week guys!. But will you be rushin’ to vote for them!

Triumphant Rangers FC captain Barry Ferguson joins the long list of footballers in your sports star chart. He’s replaced tennis champ Serena Williams who has crashed out. But with the tennis season now in full swing, perhaps the world number one will be back before long. Christina Aguilera is knocked out of your celeb chart, making way for Matrix star Keanu Reeves.

If Terry came home we could crown him king of chit-chatIrish Independent
Now the pictures were exactly the same so we can only assume that people were watching the BBC for our own Terry Wogan. This is in no way a slight on Marty who has matured into one of our most relaxed, carefree and wonderfully eccentric broadcasters but, let’s face it, you can’t really compete with Terry. His secret is that he almost completely ignores the Eurovision and uses the three hours or so to chat away to himself about whatever comes into his head. It’s like Terry’s annual state of the nation address. And clearly we love it. Who else could get away with musings like the following, on seeing one of the ageing Eurotarts who announced the points: “It’s Julie Christie!” (the woman did indeed look like the ageing sexbomb). And then the sucker punch of complete irrelevance: “Is she still married to Burt Bacharach?” And straight away one casual comment sets the whole of the British Isles wondering: “Was Julie Christie married to Burt Bacharach? Is he still alive? Is she still on the go? Are they still married?” It’s the kind of stuff that nearly makes the Eurovision watchable… And clearly we love it. Who else could get away with musings like the following, on seeing one of the ageing Eurotarts who announced the points: “It’s Julie Christie!” (the woman did indeed look like the ageing sexbomb). And then the sucker punch of complete irrelevance: “Is she still married to Burt Bacharach?” And straight away one casual comment sets the whole of the British Isles wondering: “Was Julie Christie married to Burt Bacharach? Is he still alive? Is she still on the go? Are they still married?” It’s the kind of stuff that nearly makes the Eurovision watchable. Most of the time Terry just seemed to be laughing at it. Which was fine by us. He didn’t feel under any pressure to say anything most of the time, he just laughed. Sure it beats crying.

Results of Slovene televotingesctoday.com
si News. 399 votes were cast in the 5-minute televoting and a record 76% of TV viewers tuned in to watch the programme. Slovene voters put the Russian duo t.

Participants in Norwegian Junior ESC final knownesctoday.com
in which the Norwegian entry for Junior Eurovision in Copenhagen will be chosen. Host for the even will be the same as last year, 24 year old Stian Barsnes Simonsen. He was also one of three hosts in the Scandinavian final. NRK received around 700 songs to MGP Jr.

Bump and grind of a new EuropeIrish Independent
We did well, but not too well; the belly-dancing entry won; and the Brits got the Eurovision equivalent of the black spot – Nul Points. But for the much-hyped lesbian romp falling a bit flat, you couldn’t have asked for more. Admittedly, Mickey Joe Harte did belatedly attempt to give the event a uniquely Irish touch – the split – by criticising RTE for the level of support it gave him (not what I would have thought the wisest career move at a time when it looks as if he may have to concentrate on the domestic market). Nevertheless, he can take solace from the 12 points he received from “the UK” (or from Derry and Tyrone). Clearly, one of partition’s unforeseen side-effects is that, in the era of tele-voting, all RTE has to do to guarantee at least one maximum score is to pick somebody from up north and let nature – and a population for whom multiple voting in a short period of time is the very essence of democracy – take its course.

The other players in the double-collection category : Gender-bending…International Herald Tribune
Was it really back in 1981 that Gaultier introduced underwear as fashion with the flesh-pink corset dress that opened his retrospective show? (The peacock male got his corset in 1985. ) For the designer, a fascination with underwear goes back to his 1950s childhood, when he watched his grandmother, a nurse, give massages at home to half-dressed clients and when he rummaged in her closets as she dealt Tarot cards, marveling over the mechanics of her corsetry and hats trimmed with bird-of-paradise plumes. The feathers stalked the runway as the parrot bolero worn by Dana International, the winner of the 1997 Eurovision Song contest, just as his grandmother's nude chiffon lingerie and the claret hosiery worn by his mother in the 1960s became the fetish colors of his collections. Such pure, fashion artistry, springing from a personal wellspring of creativity, is rare in the fashion world and explains why Gaultier, at 51, is up there among the greats — although he would be the last to suggest it. He has a good word for everyone. Working on a new film with the Spanish director Pedro Almodóvar (after doing the costumes for "Kika" in 1994), its 1980s setting has made him look back in admiration at the work of Thierry Mugler and Claude Montana, his competitors at the time. (Both are now more or less out of business).

Come on, Tony, let us have our sayTelegraph.co.uk
In the last Euro elections, only 24 per cent bothered to vote. My husband, I admit, is something of a Euro-spotter, taking down the numbers of directives as they leave Brussels. But we don’t discuss federalism over breakfast – the closest friends come to mentioning it is Britain’s nul points in the Eurovision Song Contest. Only our farmer next door is really angry about the EU. Last week another directive told him he couldn’t ride his vibrating tractor.

Pint to pint: Crown PosadaTelegraph.co.uk
Sinatra, Brubeck and Dean Martin followed, the needle hitting the LP with an amplified rasp and the mono sound filtering smoothly through the room. The records were neither background nor bland. If Britain had looked for Eurovision inspiration to the Crown Posada in Newcastle, the city that is a contender to be the new European City of Culture, it might not have produced the dreadful piped music that earned it nul points last Saturday night. Crown Posada, 33 Side, Newcastle upon Tyne (0191 232 1269).

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