GreenJolly – Orange Revolution 2004 Mastermind

Eurovision Song Contest 2005 participant
 


Belgium flops at Eurovision


Eurovision News Review:

* Turks deliver Eurovision delight
* Eurovision votes ‘farce’ attack
* Eurovision attracts 8.3m viewers
* Belgium flops at Eurovision
* German Press Review: Europe Should Play Bigger Role in Iraq
* RTÉ reassessing You’re A Star show
* Eurovision 2004 & Des
* Brits spare our blushes with Eurovision vote
* Bookies cut odds on PM resigning
* Dutch news in brief – 17 May 2004
* Religion and Geography?
* SJ Super 7 | www.somethingjewish.co.uk
* Eurojoke – Irish Independent
* Complacent stereotypes
* Sakis rocks TV viewers, stirs bishop

Turks deliver Eurovision delightBBC News
Istanbul’s Abdi Ipecki stadium is usually a sweaty basketball stadium, but was transformed into a stage fit for one of the biggest musical events in the world. With an enthusiastic capacity crowd flying flags of many nations, the atmosphere was electric – clearly this contest was shaping up as a night to remember. Last year’s Turkish victor Sertab Erener set the stadium ablaze with a rousing rendition of her winning song, surrounded by a coterie of gold-dusted nymphs and then the magical whirling dervishes. Presenters Meltem Cumbul and Korhan Abay followed the Eurovision tradition for elaborate costumes, indulging in cheesy banter and slightly stilted delivery… With an enthusiastic capacity crowd flying flags of many nations, the atmosphere was electric – clearly this contest was shaping up as a night to remember. Last year’s Turkish victor Sertab Erener set the stadium ablaze with a rousing rendition of her winning song, surrounded by a coterie of gold-dusted nymphs and then the magical whirling dervishes. Presenters Meltem Cumbul and Korhan Abay followed the Eurovision tradition for elaborate costumes, indulging in cheesy banter and slightly stilted delivery. But the crowd had turned out to see 24 live performances, cheer on their favourites and see who could live up to the big occasion.

Eurovision votes ‘farce’ attackBBC News
Fox, who finished 16th out of 24, pointed an accusing finger at the way some countries voted for their neighbours. His mother Tina Davies, who was in Turkey for Saturday’s final, went further, describing the scoring as farcical. Their views were backed by former Bucks Fizz singer Cheryl Baker, who said voting was more biased now than when she won.

Eurovision attracts 8.3m viewersBBC News
5% of the viewing public, rising to a peak of 10. 7 million at 2230 BST. This was a slight fall from last year’s Eurovision peak of 11 million. ITV1’s Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? Olympic Special was Saturday’s second favourite show in that time slot, attracting 5. Revamped

Eurovision viewers saw Ruslana win the song contest for Ukraine, on only the second time the country had taken part in the competition, while the United Kingdom’s James Fox came 16th. Earlier in the evening a Eurovision edition of BBC quiz The Weakest Link was won by the United Kingdom’s 2000 entry Nicki French, drawing 3.

Belgium flops at EurovisionExpatica
“We should leave her alone. She’s going back to the hotel to rest,” he added. The singer’s manager then went on to blame the Eurovision voting system for Xandee’s failure. “Eurovision is a circus. You heard the votes. It’s 12 points for a neighbour here, 12 points for a neighbour there,” Sergio added.

German Press Review: Europe Should Play Bigger Role in IraqDeutsche Welle
But the chances of that happening were always slim and are now next to none following the Iraqi abuse scandal,” the paper noted. It suggested that damage could be limited if some people high up in office were to take responsibility, but sadly, it concluded, “Washington doesn’t seem to have grasped this concept. ”
Other German papers turned their attention to the weekend’s Eurovision song contest in Istanbul, where musicians from 24 countries competed for the most points from the European public through call-in votes. This year the Ukraine took top place and will host the event next year. The Frankfurter Neue Presse commented on the acts, saying “even though Germany’s Max came in eighth with his sit down bar-stool act, it’s obvious that Europeans want something different, “namely colorful, scantily clad performers who sound sort of ethnic. ” The paper noted that it was mostly countries from southern and eastern Europe that notched up the points with neighbors and former war opponents awarding each other top billing. The paper pointed out that “old Europe” doesn’t even seem to be in the running.

RTÉ reassessing You’re A Star showrte.ie – RTE.ie
An RT? spokesperson said the broadcaster was reviewing the series to ensure that Ireland performs as best it can at next year’s Eurovision. The spokesperson added that ‘You’re A Star’ is a hugely successful programme for the national broadcaster. Tonight Ireland’s Eurovision entry Chris Doran will perform at a free open-air concert in Waterford to mark his return to the city.

Eurovision 2004 & Desabc.net.au
Monaco giving its top votes to France was also an obvious vote for quality , delivered without fear or favour. Never-the-less, Des reckons the right songs came in at the top. He also is very serious indeed when he observes that Eurovision is becoming more eclectic, and moving beyond the poppy “la la la la la la” songs which have been the way of the past. As he looks forward to a fiftieth anniversary Eurovision in Kiev next year, Mr Mangan issues a particularly heartfelt farewell to Eoin : ” May the mirror ball of Eurovision shine upon you always”. ( Eoin begins by congratulating Des Mangan )

Audio for this story is not available

As heard on 720 Breakfast.

Brits spare our blushes with Eurovision voteIrish Independent
Ireland ended up joint second last with just seven points at the end of the contest in Istanbul. A full 16 countries had voted before Ireland got on the scoreboard, with the seven points from the UK taking Chris Doran off the bottom of the table and avoiding the dreaded ‘nul points’. After the voting had finished, it was the Ukraine that emerged victorious with a total of 280 with Ruslana Lyzichko, in an outfit reminiscent of television’s Xena, Warrior Princess, singing Dzikie Tance (Wild Dances). In this year’s contest, 24 countries vied for the final prize, of which 10 were picked from a semi-final of 22 countries… The group was formed after the You’re a Startelevision programme. In the region of 300m people from across Europe tuned in to watch the contest with RTE’s Marty Whelan providing commentary live from the event. The voting pattern followed what has become typical Eurovision farce with countries giving high points to their neighbours, most evident in the Balkan states.

Bookies cut odds on PM resigningBBC News
William Hill is offering odds of 13-8 that Mr Blair will stand down compared to 14-1 on Thursday. The odds of Mr Blair leading his party in the next general election in 2005 now stand at 4-9. The premier’s possible demise has attracted more money than a British victory at the Eurovision Song Contest. A spokesman for William Hill said: “Cash poured in for him to quit. Now we are down to 13-8 and still taking three-figure bets for him to go. ”

He added that the punters’ decision not to place too much money on the British Eurovision entry James Fox, a former Fame Academy pupil, had proved “good judgement” because anyone betting on him had lost their money. “They still have a chance to win one way or another with Blair.

Dutch news in brief – 17 May 2004Expatica
Under strict conditions, euthanasia is legal in the Netherlands. The death is under investigation. Ukraine to host Eurovision 2005
Ukraine won the Eurovision Song Festival on Saturday night with a powerful number called Wild Dance. Out of 24 nations, the Dutch duo Re-union ended up in a disappointing 20th with its song Without You. The final of the 49th Eurovision was held in Istanbul, Turkey. Due to its success this year, Ukraine will host the event in Kiev next year. As it did this year, the Netherlands will have to qualify for the final via preliminary rounds again next year… Ukraine to host Eurovision 2005
Ukraine won the Eurovision Song Festival on Saturday night with a powerful number called Wild Dance. Out of 24 nations, the Dutch duo Re-union ended up in a disappointing 20th with its song Without You. The final of the 49th Eurovision was held in Istanbul, Turkey. Due to its success this year, Ukraine will host the event in Kiev next year. As it did this year, the Netherlands will have to qualify for the final via preliminary rounds again next year. [Copyright Expatica News 2004]

Subject: Dutch news.

Religion and Geography?di-ve.com
Under these circumstances, the EBU has a real problem on its hands. A system has to be devised whereby these extraneous influences will no longer remain a threat to the huge investments put up by the winners each year and the following of one hundred million viewers who follow the contest year after year. These antics will lose the Eurovision Song Contest masses of viewers and the loss of viewers will affect the kind of investment that the winning country will want to put into its effort, especially if it finds that dwindling figures will affect its ability to recoup the investment through advertising. Insofar as Malta is concerned, under these conditions we do not have hope in hell of seeing the first places of the ESC and therefore we should be the ones to lead the protest against these malpractices. Dramatic situations call for dramatic gestures if the EBU eggheads are to get it into their thick skulls that the Eurovision song contest is about music not about Geography and even less about Faiths.

SJ Super 7 | www.somethingjewish.co.ukSomething Jewish
Ukranian Odyssey: now that Ukraine have shot to victory in the 2004 Eurovision Song Contest, could the former Soviet country become the next big Jewish tourist destination? It certainly has the credentials – quite aside from the country’s Jewish history, which goes back thousands of years, it has the fourth largest Jewish community in the world (after the US, Russia and Israel) – over half a million Jews live there, with the biggest community being in the capital, Kiev. Even more Eurovision: Israel might have given us some good songs in the past, but this year’s entry, by Israeli performer David D’Or, was not one of them. The song, Leha’amim, went from poor operatic to camp rock ballad and it came as no surprise when it got knocked out at the semi-final stage. That said, D’Or only narrowly missed out on a place in the final, coming 12th in the semis. “We are very disappointed, we did believe in the song,” said a spokesman for the singer. Better luck next year! 5.

Eurojoke – Irish IndependentIrish Independent
On Saturday night we came perilously close to the evergreen nul points. Indeed, we might have preferred that doubtful distinction to our eventual derisory score. GONE are the days when we could regard the Eurovision Song Contest as virtually Irish property. On Saturday night we came perilously close to the evergreen nul points.

Complacent stereotypesKathimerini
We dragged it out from our store of stereotypes to put an ideological spin on an event that belongs to the sphere of the market and spectacle. It all came back to us ? that we are a ?brother-less nation? (it matters little whether this was heard on a state channel or trash TV, as the state television networks treated the Eurovision song contest as a major national event). It all came back to us: the Cold War language, the Iron Curtain and the anti-Greek conspiracies ? which are as obvious to us as the fact that the sun rises in the East. As Albania began giving the lower points to other countries, we made snide remarks. But when they gave us top marks, we bit our tongues. The only thing that did not came back to us was geography.

Sakis rocks TV viewers, stirs bishopKathimerini
A record 5 million people, or 86 percent of those whose TV sets were on, watched at least 1 minute of the show on state channel NET, according to the ratings. Overall, after TV channels cultivated the expectation that Rouvas would win, 34. 2 percent of people in Greece watched the show, or 75. 5 percent of those who had their TV sets on.

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